PostHeaderIcon Guide to Stock Market Investing

The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing

2010 Edition Reviews

The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2010 Edition

  • ISBN13: 9780452295827
  • Condition: New
  • Notes: BUY WITH CONFIDENCE, Over one million books sold! 98% Positive feedback. Compare our books, prices and service to the competition. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

The essential stock market guide updated with timely strategies for investing after the crash

Now in its fourth edition, Jason Kelly's The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing has established itself as a clear, concise, and highly effective guide for investing in stocks. This comprehensively updated edition contains tried-and-true investment principles to teach investors how to create and refine a profitable investment program. New strategies and content include:

•Basic tips on when to invest and how to reduce the amount of risk in this turbulent market
•A new core portfolio technique that shows readers a way to achieve 3 percent quarterly performance with the IJR exchange-traded fund
•An exclusive interview with legendary Legg Mason investment counselor, Bill Miller, including his thoughts on the financial crash of 2008

Accessible and intelligent, The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing is what every investor needs to keep pace in the current market.

Rating: (out of 33 reviews)

List Price: $ 16.00

Price: $ 4.87

The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing

The essential stock market guide updated with timely strategies for investing after the crash

Now in its fourth edition, Jason Kelly's The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing has established itself as a clear, concise, and highly effective guide for investing in stocks. This comprehensively updated edition contains tried-and-true investment principles to teach investors how to create and refine a profitable investment program. New strategies and content include:

*Basic tips on when to invest and how to reduce the amount of risk in this turbulent market
*A new core portfolio technique that shows readers a way to achieve 3 percent quarterly performance with the IJR exchange-traded fund
*An exclusive interview with legendary Legg Mason investment counselor, Bill Miller, including his thoughts on the financial crash of 2008

Accessible and intelligent, The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing is what every investor needs to keep pace in the current market.

Rating: (out of 33 reviews)

List Price: $ 16.00

Price:

More Stock Market Guide Products



10 Responses to “Guide to Stock Market Investing”

  • Zachary Hughes says:

    Review by Zachary Hughes for The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2010 Edition
    Rating:
    This book is a great book for anyone looking to invest money in the stock market. I have read many investment books and stock trading books and this is one of only 3 books that I would advise a new trader or investor to read.

    The author, Jason Kelly, starts by explaining “Why Stocks are Good Investments”. Jason points to strong and true facts that show that owning stocks is one of the best ways of increasing wealth over time. He explains how you make money in stocks and goes into the difference between “total return” and “capital appreciation”. Jason then explains why companies even sell stocks and how that works. If you are new to stock investing or trading and you do not have a clear understanding of this then you should read this. There is a quick section also about how to choose a broker to help you buy and sell stocks.

    Jason then goes into “How to Evaluate Stocks”. He explains the difference between value and growth investing. Jason does a great job of defining and explaining all of the most common terms in evaluating the fundamentals of companies including: current ratio, EPS, ROE, Net Profit Margin, P/E, and P/S. Then he explains common terms for evaluating the technicals of the stock price including: SMA, MACD, RSI, relative price strength, and volume. Knowing and understanding these terms is a must for anyone who wants to invest or trade in individual stocks.

    After reading the 1st 3 chapters you will know half the things they teach you in a 4 year Business Degree. Believe me, I have a degree in Business.

    Then Jason tells you “How the Masters Tell Us to Invest”. Here he summarizes how each of the best traders and investors of all time advise individuals to build wealth. He covers Benjamin Graham, Phillip Fisher, Warren Buffet, Peter Lynch, William O’Neil, and Bill Miller. You could read whole books about each one of these investors or you could just read these sections in Jason’s book where he breaks down their main points. Jason then has a section where he finds the common points that all these investors share called “Where the Masters Agree”. This section will be the backbone for the strategy of the author.

    Jason then explains “How History Tells Us to Invest”. Here Jason explains some backtesting on various investing methods and shows that combining Value and Growth Investing is one of the best ways to build wealth over time.

    Then we get into the real meat of the book. Section 4 “Permanent Portfolios” introduces you to easy to follow strategies to beat the market over time. This is where both new and experienced investors who have not read this book before will be able to really benefit by reading this. If you are someone who wants to beat the market by only looking at and adjusting your portfolio for a few short minutes about 4 times a year then these strategies are for you.

    Jason also has the most exhaustive list of resources for stock research I have ever come across. When you read “Research to Riches” section you will have a gateway to all the best data on stocks available through many many sources.

    In “This Books Strategy” Jason explains how we will use the “Permanent Portfolio” to build our fortress of wealth and then create and maintain a watch-list of individual stocks that we will send out of our fortress of wealth when the time is right to bring back even higher returns. Jason thoroughly explains how and where to gather information and compare it to stocks you already have on your list so that you are not overwhelmed by all the data and stock gurus available. Jason explains when may be good times to buy and when may be good times to sell stocks. He also has a very interesting way of tracking your performance and reviewing your choices to learn from the past.

    And of course he has an investment website and “Letter” to compliment what we have learned in this book. The website is a great way to read his recent observations which he updates with new articles on a regular basis and is available to anyone for free. And he has the “Letter” which is a very affordable service (about $5.35/month I think) where he emails members on updates of his portfolios and his view of the market direction. I recommend at the very least to check it out on his website where you can find a sample “Letter” and see how his portfolios have performed against the “market”.

  • Spiritgide says:

    Review by Spiritgide for The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2010 Edition
    Rating:
    I see a one-star review here that says this book is for neophyte investors. Yes, it is! It’s also for experienced investors. I have 400% in total portfolio gains over the last two years. I’m not inexperienced- and I find substantial value in this new book, as I did in his earlier one that helped me learn my investment strategy.

    Occasionally someone will ask how I managed to achieve such gains in a recession, and I tell them how I follow fundamentals- value, potential, risk assessment, and so on. I’m amazed at the number of people who think that’s crude strategy… but yet to find such a person who has done as well.

    One of the reasons some “experienced” investors don’t do as well as they should is that they forget the fundamentals, or start believing fundamentals are negotiable or don’t apply to them because of their accumulated wisdom. Experience can get in the way if you start thinking that doing something for several years automatically makes you good at it, even when your gains are say you’re not. Hogwash can get in the way too, and the investment world has plenty of that. It hides the important stuff, and distracts investors from what really makes the differences.

    Jason is one of the very few investment writers who is clear and concise, and never loses sight of the fundamentals of investing. No hogwash! He gets to the point clearly and concisely without adding copy designed to impress or confound you with his wizardry. His books are actually designed to help investors understand and profit… while most books are designed to sell, and make the author profit. Don’t expect the fancy stuff, the confusing techno-babble. Expect the core information that allows you to understand and remember the fundamentals, to grow and become better and better. One of the best investment bucks you will ever spend.

  • C. Burke says:

    Review by C. Burke for The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2010 Edition
    Rating:
    I picked this book up hoping to learn a little something about the stock market, instead I have come away with more knowledge than I ever thought I’d get out of a book. The book covers the basics and shows you how to evaluate stocks, build you own worksheet and also includes strategies. I finished it excited to start investing and use everything I had just learned. Jason Kelly breaks everything down so it is easy to understand and very entertaining to read. It’s a great book and I’d recommend it to anyone interested in understanding the stockmarket.

  • B. York says:

    Review by B. York for The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2010 Edition
    Rating:
    To be completely honest I think this book should be read by the entire population! Haha. But seriously if you feel uncomfortable about investing this book really makes things much clearer and its an easy and fun read. I’m not a big book reader and oddly enough I couldn’t put it down. My GF commented on how I would get completely lost in reading it. I think it too me three sessions to finish it. Some of which was just because I thought I should stop and digest the info. This book gets you excited about investing with a very grounded perspective and explains all the details at just the correct timing and in a logical manor. Some sort of investing is the key to long term financial security. As much as buying stocks can seem like something only people with lots of money can do that is completely false. This book puts it perfectly into perspective.

    I would also suggest ‘The Options Course’ By Fontanills. Its not near as good of a read but it makes up for it in content and technical info.

    People without a ton of money: There isn’t a day on the stock market that goes by that you couldn’t turn a hundred dollar stock purchase into $110 or more and just today I saw a stock option that was selling at $.45 and went up $.70. You could have turned $90 into $230 in about a half an hour. Read, watch read, read, think, read, watch then invest!

  • Frederick Ancheta says:

    Review by Frederick Ancheta for The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing, 2010 Edition
    Rating:
    Having come from a software development background, I began reading the book to spark my interest in financial investments. I didnt really know what to expect. After reading this book, I am now able to keep up with stock tickers and stock analysts on MSNBC, Bloomberg, and Fox Business. I can read WSJ and Google Finance charts without feeling like I am reading another language. I’ve decided to highlight my favorite parts of the book:

    Speak the Language of Stocks:

    This chapter alone was the best. For someone without any background in stock markets, this chapter alone is the holy grail of the book. It tells you what stocks are, where they come from, briefly how to evaluate them, and distinguishing growth/value. Like i said before, if you have no clue what stocks are, this chapter will be the most important in the book and the author does a great job explaining it.

    How History Tells Us to Invest:

    Being a very technical person, I found the analysis in this chapter very interesting. The author advocates the importance of P/S ratios over the popular P/E ratio. He also goes over the criteria for valuing growth stocks vs value stocks and how using both strategies can maximize returns.

    The book’s investment strategy is also very simple. The author supplies an abundance of research options for fundemental and technical specs you need to rank stocks. He also supplies worksheets, which can be printed from his website.

    For the beginner, this book is a great intro to the market. Give it a try!

  • Zachary Hughes says:

    Review by Zachary Hughes for The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing
    Rating:
    This book is a great book for anyone looking to invest money in the stock market. I have read many investment books and stock trading books and this is one of only 3 books that I would advise a new trader or investor to read.

    The author, Jason Kelly, starts by explaining “Why Stocks are Good Investments”. Jason points to strong and true facts that show that owning stocks is one of the best ways of increasing wealth over time. He explains how you make money in stocks and goes into the difference between “total return” and “capital appreciation”. Jason then explains why companies even sell stocks and how that works. If you are new to stock investing or trading and you do not have a clear understanding of this then you should read this. There is a quick section also about how to choose a broker to help you buy and sell stocks.

    Jason then goes into “How to Evaluate Stocks”. He explains the difference between value and growth investing. Jason does a great job of defining and explaining all of the most common terms in evaluating the fundamentals of companies including: current ratio, EPS, ROE, Net Profit Margin, P/E, and P/S. Then he explains common terms for evaluating the technicals of the stock price including: SMA, MACD, RSI, relative price strength, and volume. Knowing and understanding these terms is a must for anyone who wants to invest or trade in individual stocks.

    After reading the 1st 3 chapters you will know half the things they teach you in a 4 year Business Degree. Believe me, I have a degree in Business.

    Then Jason tells you “How the Masters Tell Us to Invest”. Here he summarizes how each of the best traders and investors of all time advise individuals to build wealth. He covers Benjamin Graham, Phillip Fisher, Warren Buffet, Peter Lynch, William O’Neil, and Bill Miller. You could read whole books about each one of these investors or you could just read these sections in Jason’s book where he breaks down their main points. Jason then has a section where he finds the common points that all these investors share called “Where the Masters Agree”. This section will be the backbone for the strategy of the author.

    Jason then explains “How History Tells Us to Invest”. Here Jason explains some backtesting on various investing methods and shows that combining Value and Growth Investing is one of the best ways to build wealth over time.

    Then we get into the real meat of the book. Section 4 “Permanent Portfolios” introduces you to easy to follow strategies to beat the market over time. This is where both new and experienced investors who have not read this book before will be able to really benefit by reading this. If you are someone who wants to beat the market by only looking at and adjusting your portfolio for a few short minutes about 4 times a year then these strategies are for you.

    Jason also has the most exhaustive list of resources for stock research I have ever come across. When you read “Research to Riches” section you will have a gateway to all the best data on stocks available through many many sources.

    In “This Books Strategy” Jason explains how we will use the “Permanent Portfolio” to build our fortress of wealth and then create and maintain a watch-list of individual stocks that we will send out of our fortress of wealth when the time is right to bring back even higher returns. Jason thoroughly explains how and where to gather information and compare it to stocks you already have on your list so that you are not overwhelmed by all the data and stock gurus available. Jason explains when may be good times to buy and when may be good times to sell stocks. He also has a very interesting way of tracking your performance and reviewing your choices to learn from the past.

    And of course he has an investment website and “Letter” to compliment what we have learned in this book. The website is a great way to read his recent observations which he updates with new articles on a regular basis and is available to anyone for free. And he has the “Letter” which is a very affordable service (about $5.35/month I think) where he emails members on updates of his portfolios and his view of the market direction. I recommend at the very least to check it out on his website where you can find a sample “Letter” and see how his portfolios have performed against the “market”.

  • Spiritgide says:

    Review by Spiritgide for The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing
    Rating:
    I see a one-star review here that says this book is for neophyte investors. Yes, it is! It’s also for experienced investors. I have 400% in total portfolio gains over the last two years. I’m not inexperienced- and I find substantial value in this new book, as I did in his earlier one that helped me learn my investment strategy.

    Occasionally someone will ask how I managed to achieve such gains in a recession, and I tell them how I follow fundamentals- value, potential, risk assessment, and so on. I’m amazed at the number of people who think that’s crude strategy… but yet to find such a person who has done as well.

    One of the reasons some “experienced” investors don’t do as well as they should is that they forget the fundamentals, or start believing fundamentals are negotiable or don’t apply to them because of their accumulated wisdom. Experience can get in the way if you start thinking that doing something for several years automatically makes you good at it, even when your gains are say you’re not. Hogwash can get in the way too, and the investment world has plenty of that. It hides the important stuff, and distracts investors from what really makes the differences.

    Jason is one of the very few investment writers who is clear and concise, and never loses sight of the fundamentals of investing. No hogwash! He gets to the point clearly and concisely without adding copy designed to impress or confound you with his wizardry. His books are actually designed to help investors understand and profit… while most books are designed to sell, and make the author profit. Don’t expect the fancy stuff, the confusing techno-babble. Expect the core information that allows you to understand and remember the fundamentals, to grow and become better and better. One of the best investment bucks you will ever spend.

  • C. Burke says:

    Review by C. Burke for The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing
    Rating:
    I picked this book up hoping to learn a little something about the stock market, instead I have come away with more knowledge than I ever thought I’d get out of a book. The book covers the basics and shows you how to evaluate stocks, build you own worksheet and also includes strategies. I finished it excited to start investing and use everything I had just learned. Jason Kelly breaks everything down so it is easy to understand and very entertaining to read. It’s a great book and I’d recommend it to anyone interested in understanding the stockmarket.

  • B. York says:

    Review by B. York for The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing
    Rating:
    To be completely honest I think this book should be read by the entire population! Haha. But seriously if you feel uncomfortable about investing this book really makes things much clearer and its an easy and fun read. I’m not a big book reader and oddly enough I couldn’t put it down. My GF commented on how I would get completely lost in reading it. I think it too me three sessions to finish it. Some of which was just because I thought I should stop and digest the info. This book gets you excited about investing with a very grounded perspective and explains all the details at just the correct timing and in a logical manor. Some sort of investing is the key to long term financial security. As much as buying stocks can seem like something only people with lots of money can do that is completely false. This book puts it perfectly into perspective.

    I would also suggest ‘The Options Course’ By Fontanills. Its not near as good of a read but it makes up for it in content and technical info.

    People without a ton of money: There isn’t a day on the stock market that goes by that you couldn’t turn a hundred dollar stock purchase into $110 or more and just today I saw a stock option that was selling at $.45 and went up $.70. You could have turned $90 into $230 in about a half an hour. Read, watch read, read, think, read, watch then invest!

  • Frederick Ancheta says:

    Review by Frederick Ancheta for The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing
    Rating:
    Having come from a software development background, I began reading the book to spark my interest in financial investments. I didnt really know what to expect. After reading this book, I am now able to keep up with stock tickers and stock analysts on MSNBC, Bloomberg, and Fox Business. I can read WSJ and Google Finance charts without feeling like I am reading another language. I’ve decided to highlight my favorite parts of the book:

    Speak the Language of Stocks:

    This chapter alone was the best. For someone without any background in stock markets, this chapter alone is the holy grail of the book. It tells you what stocks are, where they come from, briefly how to evaluate them, and distinguishing growth/value. Like i said before, if you have no clue what stocks are, this chapter will be the most important in the book and the author does a great job explaining it.

    How History Tells Us to Invest:

    Being a very technical person, I found the analysis in this chapter very interesting. The author advocates the importance of P/S ratios over the popular P/E ratio. He also goes over the criteria for valuing growth stocks vs value stocks and how using both strategies can maximize returns.

    The book’s investment strategy is also very simple. The author supplies an abundance of research options for fundemental and technical specs you need to rank stocks. He also supplies worksheets, which can be printed from his website.

    For the beginner, this book is a great intro to the market. Give it a try!

Leave a Reply





Subscription
Enter your primary email address to get our free newsletter.
You can leave the list at any time. Removal instructions are included in each message.